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20100901
20100930
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
. whether you send a letter to new jersey or virginia, it cost the same amount. levels of service at time of use are not differentiated. based upon our research, if you go to the bottom of that page, that is rarely ever used in power rate setting. you would imagine not a lot of proposals will be before you for that in late november and early december, nor before right fairness. however, in class differentiated, that is where we looked at residential demand verses commercial demand -- versus commercial demand, we can separate large businesses or so families or anything else. that is frequently used in water, waste water, and power setting. the next category of rates is two part rates. this is what you have now for the water bill, where we have a charge that represents 20% of the average bill related to fixed equipment and fixed capital costs. then there is an 80% volumetric where the more you use the more you are billed -- volumje metric where the more you use the more you are billed. tiered -- if you are a super user, it is there a way to structure a discount for people with low usage tax
and the empty collapse. night will still holdup after all these years. summer snap. >> virginia tech. the loner is here. the one who stopped listening. the one with the hidden fuse. with the fist. with the hole in his heart. with the cool guns, the one who blasts away. who kills just because. who kills as well because there's nothing left but the dead. kills himself. suicide on top of all these kills and now you know, what a mar gin in old baghdad in the wrong place at the wrong time why you're mourning is going in one ear of the deaf tomorrow. and out the deafening utter. air cane. one, the sorrow these many months isn't because celebrities put eyes all over my body as i was in the u.s. again. not the other america. it comes from the footprint of a kick stab in my back. got riding a bus to a reading with some really destitute brothers and sisters in a 16, 3 office space. i am sitting in the rear of the bus reading a translation of the book of the concealed mystery. my eyes are risen from a black woman standing and talking on her cell phone. i voice decibeled, latino black and white workers. wh
'm with the water out of alexandria, virginia, i want to address legislative things but public engage meant. i think the most important things we can do in terms of communication with the hengs, is water is one voice. it's very important. when i say water, i mean water and waist water. it's very important that the message dare that i completely agree it has to be clear and distinct but right now we have echos and when we speak to washington there's an echo effect and we need to be one voice and i think that needs to be clear. >> thank you. yes? >> hi, i'm with the california public utilities commission. i watched the news last night and another senator was really claiming on the debate on global warming, gee, i think you're saying it's profitable for the green industries now and i'm thinking, of course it needs to be profitable and really the fossil fuel and oil industries that are making hundreds more times more profit and that's what drives this. if we could internalize externalities and middest oil and regardless of your political leaning if you or we could internalize that that's what it takes
of virginia, they can become an overstay and can become denied to come back into this country. so it is very important, and i really thank you, the immigrant rights commission, for supporting a resolution to include it into comprehensive immigration reform, and we need to make sure that exrenlsive immigration be truly immigration and includes all families. we should not leave families out. thank you. >> thank you for your comments. >> hi. my name is nadia, and i work for the san francisco human rights commission. the commission investigates cases of discrimination based on a number of categories, one of which is national origin, whether that is discrimination in housing, public accommodation, that means any business establishment you go to, or employment. we interpret, especially in instances of housing-based discrimination, that immigration status is part of national origin discrimination. we just want to let the forum know about this, and my colleague been talking about the sanctuary city. in addition, on tuesday, november 17 of this month, we
immigrants from virginia to missouri. i never really thought about immigration much growing up. my grandfather was italian. i was aware he had a different life from me. and very grateful for the opportunities that he give us. my father was the youngest child growing up in the depression. all they wanted to do was the american. he does not even know italian. i never even thought about it. during the development of a career path, i fell into immigration. like a lot of young attorneys, i was interested in human rights. i was offered a job at the department of justice with the ins. i was not tried to do it. i started thinking about what i cared about. it was public service. you make a difference where you are. i believed for the 13 years that i was in ind and then dhs, that i was able to help make changes within the government structure. i was detailed to senator kennedy's office. i worked on the immigration bill. when it was time to go back to dhs -- i decided i needed to be more engaged in the public debate. there's some things you cannot do as a public servant that you can do on the
, and she is not eligible for city housing, so she ends up leaving try and moving to virginia. this is the problem with the ordinary in justice. there are collateral consequences, and we end up paying for them as taxpayers. we pay for them because people cannot get a federal grants for loans for school. they go on welfare. they do not get to go to their jobs. these are the hidden cost we rarely see. why do they love him so much if he was doing these things that are against the law? the bottom line is when hank saw of lawyer cared about the client, he would make an effort to help that lawyer, said there is one woman who is a prostitute, and she had a lawyer who keeps doing her case pro bono. she keeps getting arrested for prostitution, and each time he tried to get her help, but when no one was looking, that is when the worst thing happened. there is a guy who is the town drunk, and his name is john casey. i met him, and he was drinking an enormous 10 of the year. it was of vero -- enormous can of beer. it was unfaia barrel. he was thrown into jail. casey walked back into the c
. keyes. miss susan mcintyre. mr. tom purpose. mr. tho-biaz. miss williams. mr. errol wishom. ms. virginia wright. >> please speak and your microphones. we are being recorded and televised. we want to hear everything that you have to say. i would like to first acknowledge from the senator's office, miss erin keenan. we know that center -- senator yee is a strong advocate for mental health in san francisco and throughout the state of california. we appreciate him sending a representative here to witness the proceedings. thank you very much. i want to welcome you all to the public hearing on the impact of the mental health budget cuts. over the past 10 years, the severe reductions in inpatient psychiatric bed capacity has led to a crisis in san francisco. these cuts are a great threat to public safety. they expose the city to increasing costs in crime and homelessness while failing to provide humane treatment and the hope of recovery to residents with mental illness. when services are cut, we end up paying higher costs in our hospitals, streets, and jails. tonight, we will hear from front-li
have lived with in this country. it is a narrative that is familiar to those in virginia, and the last major constitutional challenge. when we look at the issue of interracial marriage. this is a fast-tracked narrative, so i am hopeful. i would not have imagined it. we have had good days and bad days, we have seen success advanced around the world, and i don't think anyone could have imagined a more optimistic setting. we have had setbacks in other states that have given us pause and caution. this is who i am, my last breath. this has never been about politics. you look back in your life and you are staying in principle. you are given a moment in time to do the right thing. i said this to my father about the issue. good people i love disagree. but whether you agree with me or not, you know it. i have a big propblem voting for people i don't trust, because they are telling me what they think i want to hear, not what i believe. this is what i believe, and my cards are on the table. i saw that as a student of history. in 1967, 70% of americans opposed interracial marriage. there is a fund
martin, dr. jones, susan mcintyre, virginia wright, tom purvixs, officer dunn. i like to thank you all for participating in this very special hearing. i would like to make sure that the things said this evening reached the ears of those in office at this moment. those who control the purse strings, those who make the decisions to make these cuts. we let you hear from firsthand responders, from those who are on the ground, from those professionals who have experience dealing with those in crisis. we've heard from the public this evening, passionate testimony regarding help services help out and why we need to continue with services. with that, i would like to thank you all for coming. again, we have openings on the mental health board. i hope you will grab some of our fliers and get in touch with our staff to explore the possibility of being able to sit here and make changes have been -- happen. the mental health board has done fantastic things like bringing the mental health services act money into the state of california down to the san francisco county, sort of by passing some steps
in our panel today are ginger bowler, content manager, the second road, charlottesville, virginia; cynthia reinbock, vice president, clinical services, crc health corporation, cupertino, california; eric hellmuth, director of technology and online communications, joined together, boston university school of public health, boston, massachusetts; dr. farrokh alemi, professor of health, systems administration, school of nursing and health studies, georgetown university, washington, d.c. about 23 million people throughout the country have a problem with alcohol or elicit drugs in the united states. only about 4 million of those have said that they pursued treatment. so that leaves an incredible gap, dr. alemi. what can the online services bring to the need to provide more addiction treatment services? online services can do a great deal. they can reach people that are rural. they can reach people inside cities that have difficulty commuting. i know a lot of psychiatrists that see their patients on the phone. when we talk about online, we don't just think about computers. we think abou
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)

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